Tips For Creating A Great Confirmation Email

We have been pretty busy at Trendline these days. In addition to being super busy with our awesome clients, we have managed to sign up for some great email programs just to see how they handle things.  As I watched the welcome emails and first few interactions with these companies, there was one disturbing trend that I started to see amongst companies who leveraged an email to either confirm my subscription or re-confirm (DOI) that I had subscribed with the call to action of wanting me to click to confirm.  Whether you send a confirmation email or a DOI confirmation email (prior to my welcome or series of welcomes) here are a few tips that you should consider:

  1. Brand It – Don’t send me an email asking me to click or confirm my subscription that looks like some IT guy created it at 2 am with little supervision from the marketing department.  After all, this is my first interaction with you in email so you have to make it count.  Put a logo in there and for kicks, maybe a splash of a template so I know what to look for.  Sending me a text email if you are visual brand is lazy.
  2. Write It – Write something that is meaningful and doesn’t smell that you could care less about my subscription.  Get someone in your marketing department to write to your voice and make it personal to me.  You are either asking me to confirm my willingness to subscribe or at the very least tell me what I can expect.
  3. Send It – Don’t send it from some rogue internal server with a different IP set up from some IT guy with a do not reply email and no FROM.  Again…this is my first impression of you..don’t do yourself a disservice by making yourselves bad.
  4. Check It – According to Return Path, about 76% of all email makes it to the inbox.  Periodically check to see if this email you are sending makes it to the inbox and if not, do something about it.
  5. Optimize It – This is not one of those set it and forget it emails…this is your opportunity to optimize the first touch with the subscriber.  At the very least, test subject lines, but move beyond that and test copy, imagery and more to make it right so the subscriber clicks it or views it every time.

For the last several years, I have talked with clients and spoke at events about the importance of the little stuff.  Sometimes the clearest path to a better program lies in an email that often goes unnoticed and neglected for years.  I have seen dramatic shifts in programs with sometimes the littlest of optimization around things like confirmation emails, password resets and subscriber initiated emails.  If you haven’t done something like this in awhile, drop what you can and focus on the little stuff that can really matter.

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